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Petes & Canadian Cancer Society Introduce 2014 Campaign Theme

Jan 08, 2014 - 21:55 GMT

The Peterborough Petes, in association with the Canadian Cancer Society Peterborough & District Unit, are excited to announce the details of the fifth annual Petes Pink in the Rink fundraising campaign.

The 2014 campaign will feature Honourary Chairpeople John Druce and Courtney Druce. John, a Petes alumnus, played 104 games over three seasons with the Petes and was drafted by the Washington Capitals in 1985 before going on to play 531 regular season NHL games. John’s daughter, Courtney, is a four-time cancer survivor, beating Leukemia three times before winning her most recent bout with Vaginal Cancer. Courtney writes a popular blog entitled Sassy Blonde – Cancer Be Gone!

The theme, “Daddy’s Girls” will be highlighted throughout the campaign, culminating in the Petes’ home game against the Oshawa Generals on Thursday, February 6th at 7:05pm. At the game, there will be several fundraising activities including a chuck-a-puck, silent auction, and online jersey auction where fans can bid on the commemorative jerseys worn during the game.

All fundraising initiatives throughout the campaign will support women’s cancers. The first fundraiser will take place on Friday, January 10th from 5:30pm to 8:30pm at the Kelsey’s and Montana’s restaurants in Peterborough. Petes players will participate as celebrity servers collecting donations for the campaign, and will also be selling and signing commemorative “Daddy’s Girls” t-shirts.

“We are honoured to have an event that brings the Peterborough Petes and Canadian Cancer Society together, allowing all Peterborough hockey fans the opportunity to support such an important cause,” said Lyndsey Fullman, Fundraising Coordinator for the Canadian Cancer Society Ontario Division.

 

Through four years, the Petes and the Canadian Cancer Society Peterborough & District Unit have raised over $250,000 in the fight against various cancers. This year, the goal is to raise $60,000 in order to surpass the $300,000 mark in total fundraising dollars. 

 

John Druce

John Druce, a Peterborough native, was a right winger for the Peterborough Petes for three seasons between 1983 and 1986. He played in a total of 104 regular season and 33 play-off games for the Petes, amassing a total of 40 goals, 45 assists, and 85 points along with 229 penalty minutes. In 1985, John was drafted by the Washington Capitals 40th overall. The 6’2”, 195 lb winger played a total of 584 NHL regular season and play-off games, totalling 130 goals, 132 assists, 262 points, and 385 penalty minutes through his career from 1988 to 1997 with Washington, Winnipeg, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia. John also spent time in the AHL, IHL, and DEL (Germany). John is perhaps most well-known for his performance in the 1989-90 NHL play-offs, where he recorded 17 points including 14 goals in just 15 games, despite only scoring 11 points in 45 regular season games.

 

Post-retirement, John has worked as a junior hockey analyst for Rogers Sportsnet, and has been extremely active in cancer research initiatives. In 2010, he was made honorary constable with the Peterborough Lakefield Community Police Service for his contributions to the Pedal For Hope campaign. John currently works for Freedom 55 Financial in Peterborough, while also raising money for cancer research along with local artist Tim Grosjean. 

Courtney Druce

Courtney Druce, John’s daughter, was first diagnosed with Leukemia at the age of 15, and has courageously beaten cancer four times. Courtney, at just 25 years of age, is a graduate of Lakefield College School as well as Queen’s University. Upon graduation from LCS, she received the James Birrell Award for overcoming personal obstacles, showing courage, and inspiring others.

 

Courtney writes an extremely popular blog entitled “Sassy Blonde – Cancer Be Gone!”, through which she chronicles were battles with cancer. In her blog, “No story will go untold, or be edited. Everything from diagnosis, to treatment, and life after. Be prepared . . . for everything and anything.”